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CONDOM USE AND IT’S BENEFITS

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CONDOM USE IT’S BENEFITS

By Rawlings Oke Godwin

On 7 Jun, 2022

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CONDON USE AND IT’S BENEFITS

Condom use has increased over the last 20 years, the willingness to use a condom during sex has increased massively. In 2016, 91 percent of people surveyed said they only had sex with a condom. Only 9 percent said they never use condoms.

An encouraging trend, but 37.9 million people worldwide are still infected with HIV. Allthough, around 87 percent of all infections and unwanted pregnancies could be prevented buy using condom correctly.

There are good reasons why you should insist on using a condom during sex, or why a man should use one himself. You can find out the ten most important ones below.

1. Condoms are effective in protecting against sexually transmitted diseases

Whether it’s chlamydia or syphilis, sexually transmitted diseases are not pleasant for either women or men. Especially with changing sexual partners or sex with strangers, you run the risk of becoming infected.

It is a misconception that an infected person must show symptoms or that you can detect an STD. Using a condom protects you from these conditions and ensures that you can indulge in pleasure with your partner without fear of nasty consequences.

2. Condoms protect against unwanted pregnancy

Family planning is an exciting topic, but a child is by no means desired as a result of every sex. The pill and the condom are considered to be the safest methods of effectively preventing pregnancy. For one-night stands, the pill should never be used as a contraceptive alone, as it does not protect against HIV and other diseases. As a man, you also do not know whether the woman is actually taking the pill and whether she is consistently sticking to the times when she is taking it.

An unwanted pregnancy can have unpleasant consequences for both women and men. Most of the time, a child doesn’t fit into the life plan at all or it was born in a one-night stand. An abortion can have traumatic consequences for the woman and represents a physical intervention with all its risks. A condom is a good and effective method of preventing this.

 

3. Condoms protect against HIV

At least an 80 percent reduction in HIV infection is possible with the use of condoms. HIV is most commonly transmitted through sex. Contrary to the cliché, it is not only people from poor countries or homosexual men who are infected with the HI virus. Heterosexual people can also become infected through unprotected sex.

According to a study with Brazilian men , the number of heterosexual men among new infections is highest, followed by homosexual men. Thus, the outdated stereotype that HIV is an infection for gay and bisexual men is debunked.

The risk of infection when using a condom can be drastically reduced. This in turn allows you to have a more relaxed sex life, since you don’t have to constantly think about a possible illness.

4. You recognize condom failures immediately

The effectiveness of condoms correlates with correct use, but no contraceptive method is 100% reliable. You only notice the failure of the contraceptive pill when symptoms of an infection or an unwanted pregnancy appear. If the condom fails, it shows up immediately after use. You can see a tear, a defect or a slipping off directly when the sexual intercourse is over. In this case, there is still time for preventive action!

A possible pregnancy can be treated with the morning-after pill. In an emergency, HIV prophylaxis can also be carried out. You can also specifically look out for symptoms of sexually transmitted diseases in order to have them treated immediately.

You can greatly minimize the risk of a condom failing with the right size and correct use!

5. Feeling better about having sex with strangers

Singles don’t always have it easy and the desire to live out sexually is not only present in couples. So it’s no wonder that 61 percent of people between the ages of 25 and 29 have already had a one-night stand. A nice development, because no matter how great the pleasure with a masturbator and vibrator may be, every now and then it just has to be a real partner.

Using a condom allows you to relax and enjoy. Because you have the certainty that you are protecting yourself as best as possible against sexually transmitted diseases and unwanted events such as pregnancy. Relaxed sex is often a product of the psyche. And this is where worries and concerns about the partner’s health can set in very quickly.

6. Show responsibility as a man

Most contraceptives (birth control pills, spirals, hormone injections) are used by women. The condom is the only way you can show responsibility as a man. You can take turns buying the condoms as long as she knows your size. You can also share the costs. However, by using condoms you have the opportunity to take a load off your partner and take an active role in preventing illness and unwanted events.

7. Condoms are free from side effects

Unless one of you is suffering from a latex allergy, condoms are one of the safest contraceptive methods with the fewest side effects. Choosing hormonal contraceptives is a long-term decision. Taking the pill has side effects for women. The risk of thrombosis increases, especially if you are overweight, over 35 years old or smoke while taking the pill. These risks can be completely avoided if you use a condom during sex.

However, even if you are a woman on the pill, the additional use of condoms can be beneficial. The pill can prevent unwanted pregnancy, but not the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV. Therefore, when having sex with strangers or with different people: Despite the pill, a condom is mandatory for safer sex.

8. Condoms are inexpensive and readily available

Sex cannot always be planned. Sometimes you meet a really hot guy at the disco or you have a spontaneous date and you can’t rule out ending up in bed together. In this case, condoms are the best way to prevent quickly and effectively. You can buy condoms almost anywhere. Many clubs have vending machines that will provide you with small packets of three condoms. Be sure to check the expiration date!

But you can also get condoms in different colors, flavors and sizes in drugstores, supermarkets and pharmacies. You can buy them in any city, have them ready as easy procurement is guaranteed even when traveling almost around the world now. So you are always on the safe side, even if spontaneous sex is in the house and you are not currently taking a pill.

9. Condoms are also suitable for sex toys

You want to use a dildo together with your partner? Whether in a homosexual or heterosexual relationship, sharing sex toys can transmit infections. This also applies if you first want to use your mini vibrator anally and then vaginally.

In this case, using a condom can protect you. You can simply pull it over your sex toy and throw it away after use. If you use your toy for someone other than yourself, it is still hygienically clean afterwards and you can experiment with each other to your heart’s content.

10. You show responsibility in sex

Acting responsibly generates sympathy. This is especially true when it comes to sex. If you as a man meet a woman and she wants to meet you, you will be able to collect points with responsibility. You’re showing her that she can count on you and that you won’t risk an illness for a bit of sexual pleasure.

Conversely, as a woman, you can show a lot of personal responsibility if you have condoms with you on a date with a man. You make your own rules and determine that you only engage in sex if your partner uses a condom. Responsible sex is many times more fun than sex with the fear of infection.

REFERENCE

https://www.hiv.gov/hiv-basics/overview/data-and-trends/global-statistics

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7212321/

Genital Herpes

 

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