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Osteoporosis : Why Her?

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Osteoporosis

By Rawlings Oke Godwin

On 7 Jan, 2022

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Osteoporosis is a disease that causes the body’s bones to become fragile. As a result, they are readily broken. Low bone mass and bone tissue loss are common symptoms, which can lead to weak and fragile bones. Fractures and broken bones are more common in people with osteoporosis, especially in the hip, spine, and wrist.

 

Osteoporosis is a disease that affects both men and women, although it begins significantly earlier in life. At around the age of 25, bone density reaches its maximum. As a result, it is critical to developing strong bones at a young age in order for them to remain strong later in life. One of the ways people create healthy bones is by getting enough calcium and exercising.

 

Osteoporosis affects 10 million Americans, and 18 million more have poor bone mass, making them vulnerable to the illness. Women account for four out of every five cases of osteoporosis. One in every two women and one in every eight men will get an osteoporosis-related fracture over their lifetime.

Table of Contents

The How?

Osteoporosis occurs when fresh bone growth and old bone resorption are out of balance. Phosphate and calcium are two minerals that are required for normal bone growth.

Calcium is also required for the healthy functioning of the heart, brain, and other organs. The body may reabsorb calcium from the bones for usage in those vital organs in order to maintain their functioning. As a result, the bones may become weaker, resulting in brittle, fragile, and easily broken bones.

 

Women/ the difference

A deficiency of certain hormones, particularly estrogen in women and androgen in men, is the major cause of osteoporosis. Women over the age of 60 are more likely to be diagnosed with the condition. When women reach menopause, their estrogen levels drop, raising their risk of osteoporosis.

 

Overuse of corticosteroids or Cushing syndrome), thyroid difficulties, lack of muscular use, bone cancer, certain genetic abnormalities, use of certain drugs, and problems like inadequate calcium in the diet are some of the other reasons for osteoporosis.

Risk factors

  • Gender (women are more likely than men to develop osteoporosis)
  • Race (whites and Asians are more likely to develop the disease)
  • Postmenopausal status
  • Irregular periods
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Anorexia or bulimia
  • Heavy alcohol consumption
  • Corticosteroid use
  • Anti-convulsant use

 

Symptoms

 

Osteoporosis frequently has no symptoms early on in the course of the illness. Later on, you may experience dull discomfort in your bones or muscles, especially in your lower back or neck.

Sharp pains may appear unexpectedly as the condition advances. It’s possible that it’ll get worse if you do something that puts pressure on the area. It’s also possible if the area is delicate.

Women who have reached menopause and are experiencing persistent discomfort in places such as the neck or lower back should see their doctor for a thorough examination, which may include a risk assessment and bone density screening.

 

Check this: Osteoporosis Exercises

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